Posts by Intern

Kitty Felde

Kitty Felde

Kitty Felde is the host and executive producer of the Book Club for Kids podcast. She’s an award-winning public radio journalist, winning dozens of Golden Mike Awards, AP Awards, and ABA Silver Gavel Awards. She’s reported from Africa, The Netherlands, Canada, Los Angeles, and Washington, DC. Kitty also writes plays and kids books. Her agent is Eric Myers. She fell in love with young adult literature when she was still a young adult herself, working at her local public library.

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Craig Getting

Craig Getting

Craig Getting (@MCGetting) is the Education Director at Lantern Theater Company in Philadelphia, PA, where he also works as a freelance director. Serious things he likes: Forrest Gump, Waiting for Godot, baseball, Kind of Blue. Goofy things he likes: Jurassic Park, Cool Dog, baseball. His bowling average currently hovers in the mid-120s.

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Andrew Cunningham

Andrew Cunningham

Andrew Cunningham (@AndrewWrites) is Lead Editor at The Wirecutter. Before that, he was a computer technician who spent most of his time clearing paper jams from ancient laser printers. An Ohio native, Andrew spent a five-year stint in New Jersey (it’s nicer than it sounds) before settling down in Philadelphia, PA.

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Misa Sugiura

Misa Sugiura

Misa Sugiura is a first time novelist whose ancestors include a samurai, a stowaway, a poet, and a priestess. After college, Misa lived in Japan, where she fell in love with skiing and sumo. She briefly considered becoming a ski bum in Nagano, but decided to go to graduate school instead. She went on to teach high school English in Santa Clara, California. Queer students who came out to Misa during her eight years in the classroom-in letters, during talks after school, and in emails from college-were part of the inspiration behind her debut novel, It’s Not Like It’s a Secret (Harper Teen). 

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Kristalyn Shefveland

Kristalyn Shefveland

Kristalyn Marie Shefveland is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Southern Indiana and the author of Anglo-Native Virginia: Trade, Conversion, and Indian Slavery in the Old Dominion, 1646-1722, Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2016. A scholar of the indigenous Eastern Woodlands of North America, her research and publications focus on the intersections of settlers and indigenous peoples in the American Southeast and she is currently working on a book on historical memory of Florida.

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Jared Yates Sexton

Photo Credit: Stacie McDaniel

Jared Yates Sexton was one of the first journalists to attend and report from the 2016 Donald Trump rallies. He is a writer whose political writing has appeared in The New York Times, The New Republic, Salon, and elsewhere. He is the author of three collections of fiction and a crime-novel. Currently he serves as an Associate Professor of Creative Writing at Georgia Southern University.

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Ranjani Murali

Ranjani Murali (Photo credit: Ojus Patel-Desai)

Ranjani Murali is a Chicago-based writer and artist. She received her MFA in Poetry from George Mason University in 2010. She currently teaches writing and literature at Harper. She is the recipient of the Kay Evans Poetry Fellowship from the Vermont Studio Center. She also received the Fine Arts Work Center’s Archie D. and Bertha H. Walker Foundation Scholarship in Nonfiction. Her poems and translations have appeared in Phoebe, Word Riot, Eclectica, and a variety of acclaimed Indian journals and anthologies including Almost Island, Pratilipi, Vayavya, The Bombay Literary Magazine, and Helter Skelter. Ranjani won the Srinivas Rayaprol poetry prize in 2014, awarded annually by the Hyderabad University and the Rayaprol Trust in India to recognize talented new Indian poets writing in English. In 2015, she went on to win Almost Island’s inaugural manuscript prize judged by Eliot Weinberger and Adil Jussawala.. Her second manuscript won the The Great Indian Poetry Collective’s (GIPC’s) Editor’s Choice award and will be available next year. She is the author of Blind Screens. 

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Matthew Davis

Matthew Davis (Photo credit: Evan Cantwell)

Matthew Davis is the founding director of The Alan Cheuse International Writers Center at George Mason University. He has been a fellow at The Black Mountain Institute at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas and a Fulbright Fellow to Syria and Jordan. He holds an MFA in nonfiction writing from the University of Iowa, an MA in international relations from The Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, and is the award-winning author of When Things Get Dark: A Mongolian Winters Tale. He is also an Eric and Wendy Schmidt Fellow at New America, where he is working on a book about the Gallaudet University football team, the education of the deaf and hard-of-hearing, and the changing nature of deaf identity.
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Kathleen Barber

Kathleen Barber

Kathleen Barber was raised in Galesburg, Illinois. She graduated from the University of Illinois and Northwestern University School of Law, and previously practiced bankruptcy law at large firms in Chicago and New York. She is the author of the debut novel Are You Sleeping. 

 

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Colin Sargent

Colin Sargent

Colin W. Sargent, Ph.D., is a novelist, magazine publisher, playwright, and poet. He has been invited to teach writing at the College of William and Mary (Fall 2017). His 2016 novel The Boston Castrato is published by Barbican Press of London. “A heartrending, deep, rip-roaring novel, The Boston Castrato is destined to be a modern classic, a novel that captures 1920s Boston through the eye of a young Italian castrato seeking love.”- Barbican Press. Born in Portland, Maine, Sargent is the founding editor and publisher of Portland Monthly magazine (est. 1985, 100,000 print readers) as well as a past board member of the literacy organization Maine Reads. An Annapolis graduate, Sargent has been awarded the Maine individual artist fellowship in literature, a Stonecoast MFA, and a Ph.D. in creative writing from Lancaster University in the UK. His screenplay Montebello Ice is under option at Gideon Films. “Barbican Press is honored to launch Colin W. Sargent’s The Boston Castrato—a modern classic in the making. This book does for the 1920s Boston what E.L. Doctorow did for New York in Ragtime: it grabs a city out of history, mixes in some fiction and makes it vivid. Be it the high style of Boston’s Parker House Hotel; the flagrant, flagrant set who dance attendance on the poet Amy Lowell; the scientists and shipbuilders and politicians and utter rogues who raise the city from the dirt; it all shimmers into reality as an outsider leads us into its quaking heart.

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